Members Gallery

 


 

Dana Sypniewski

 

As a child Dana showed great interest in drawing, so beautifully illustrating her books and school projects that teachers often kept them. With a passion for colour and interior decorating, Dana went on to study at the Julian Ashton School of Arts followed by sculpture and colour and design at East Sydney Technical College. Dana was later inspired by art tutor colleagues, whilst employed at Macquarie University.

 

Dana has taken classes and workshops with local art societies, conducted by high profile artists including Drummoyne Art Society’s John Perkins, whom she finds inspiring. She has attended ‘Art in Action’ for over 20 years and painted in Tuscany with artist Ron Muller of Melbourne. Her paintings can be found in England, Italy and Poland in high profile establishments.

 

Dana’s Australian landscape work captures a translucent quality with her use of colour, light and harmony, achieved by loading the brush with very thick paint and little medium. Composition is also very important. Dana draws and paints in oils, acrylics and watercolour, and her subject matter is diversified including both modern and traditional.

 

Dana has won many art awards and first prizes including the Bankstown and Drummoyne Art Societies, the Combined Art Society and Rotary Exhibitions.

 

At Drummoyne’s Open Awards 2011, Dana won the Member’s Section with Country Magic. The Judge said of this work “This painting captures everything about the subject – taking the viewer on a relaxed journey. It has a pleasing simplicity and interesting surface texture. Dana’s winning painting has also appeared in the Australian Artist Magazine on two occasions.


 

Leeka Gruzdeff FRAS

 

Leeka graduated from the National Art School in 1966 before working in a commercial studio for several years. After marrying and raising a family, she returned to her fine art practice, influenced by prominent artists Ross Davies, Ina Hanson and Joshua Smith. Leeka has achieved great success and recognition for her work, accumulating over one hundred first art prizes and twice been an Archibald Prize finalist; first in 1986 with her portrait of Rita Hunter and again in 1988 with Don Burrows. She has held 16 solo exhibitions and participated in many group shows. In 2000 she was promoted to Fellow Member of the Royal Art Society of NSW.

 

Leeka has taught pastel, painting and watercolor classes at the Castle Hill Art Society and conducted workshops at Bathurst University, Art in Action 1994, Camp Creative in Bellingen, Port Maquarie and the Blue Mountains, as well as conducting private lessons in her Greenacre studio. Some of Leekas students are now prize winning artists or teachers.

 

Leeka’s next challenge is to teach creative watercolor classes suitable for beginners or experienced artists to help unlock their creativity.


 

Louise Beck

 

Louise was a secondary school teacher before she became a fulltime artist. She received her formal training at the Julian Ashton Art School and then went on to work with various artists and mentors – Joshua Smith and Yve Close having a significant influence on her portraiture.

 

Over the past ten years Louise has worked on a continuing theme, which she calls her “Skyscapes” – surreal images of city glass buildings that reflect and distort all that surround them.

 

She has been a finalist and winner in many art prizes such as the Mt Eyre, the Black Swan, Portia Geach and Drummoyne, Lane Cove and Hunters Hill Art Societies.


 

Judy Cowen

 

Judy began painting and drawing courses at Meadowbank TAFE, completing her studies in 1992 before joining DAS where she began exhibiting and winning awards, obtaining good sales and gaining recognition.

 

Judy was invited to join an art group in the Sydney suburb of Thornleigh, painting still life arrangements and enjoying numerous workshop trips to country regions of NSW. Judy continued exhibiting in Sydney venues, including regular Art Society exhibitions.

 

In 1999, Judy joined a team of 12 artists that set up and ran the artist’s co-op, Art at the Butcher Shop, in Great North Road, Five Dock before returning to Meadowbank TAFE to pursue skills in photography, sculpture, printmaking, drawing, painting and computer imaging.

 

In 2003 Judy flew to Alice Springs and, inspired by the stunning red earth, blue skies and beautiful aussie white gums, produced a series of outstanding paintings and in 2004 held her first solo exhibition Red Dust. It was after this success that Judy had the opportunity to travel to Italy with a group of artists, culminating in the two artists exhibition Venice Inspirations that included over 100 paintings.

 

Judy taught several student groups from 2004 to 2014, inspiring them to both enjoy their art and become creative along the way.

 

Many of Judy’s works are enjoyed in collections in Australia, with several sales proudly taken to collections in England, America and other overseas countries.

 

 


 

Phil Kent

 

Phil started his art journey over 50 years ago with a drawing class at The Royal Art Society with Australian artists Fred Bates. He then continued with painting classes both in the studio and plein air. Phil's current focus is portraiture and drawing.

 

"What I like about art is that you can follow whichever path takes your interest."


 

Barbara Aroney

 

I like to play with colour, shape, tone, texture and fine tune compositions in both abstract and representational work. I am stirred by nature, plants, landscape and also buildings, especially interiors. For some time I have been seduced by the light inside the large, empty spaces of woolsheds. The distinctive buildings, constructed of local timber, are unique and compelling. In 2013 at the Incinerator Art Space, Willoughby, I exhibited paintings of interiors of woolsheds called Cathedrals of Wood – Painting In Woolsheds.

 

More recently I have been capturing the spaces of the oneplus2 studios where I work. The space and light are appealing, but unlike woolsheds, artists have plenty of stuff – paintings, drawings, paint pots, brushes and all the paraphernalia that artists accumulate. It has led me to consider the abstract qualities of these things in space.

 

I have found that books, especially concertina books, lend themselves to recording precious memories that are held in the objects important in our lives. I found watercolour is a beautiful medium to bring out the delicacy and abstract qualities of objects.

 


 

Xavier Ghazi

 

Xavier Ghazi has been illustrating since 1995, having several group exhibitions and winning first prize in the portrait category in the 1993 International Art Show in Anglet, France. Following his move to Sydney, Xavier was part of several group exhibitions and has had two solo shows at the ArtHouse Hotel and been the winner of the Bald Archy prize five times.